Aflac Duck Sound File

3/31/2018by

Registering an aural trademark with the United States Patent and Trademark Office can be difficult. Harley-Davidson famously tried for years to get this protection for the purr of their V-twin motorcycle engine, only to be locked in legal limbo for so long that they gave up and withdrew their request. By 1998, only in the United States. For reference, around 730,000 total trademarks had been granted by that time. Since then, more and more companies have been able to lock down so-called 'sound marks,' but the distinction is still relatively rare. Harley-Davidson might've missed out, but here are 18 examples of sounds that have been successfully trademarked.

My question is to decide which format will result in the best sound through playind the recorded digital file through J.River as my playing software and PS. My personal impression is that aflac when compared against Wav sound more detailed, more energetic, with stronger bass. I prefer the Duck to wav. On the other hand, even some unusual devices can be protected, such as sounds (for example, the familiar sound of the duck quacking “AFLAC”), shapes (such as the. Trademark filing fees (including a reduction of the application filing fee to $325) if the applicant files the application electronically rather than in paper form. Serial Number: 76641094. That iconic two-strike 'chung chung' sound was created by composer Mike Post, who also wrote the show's theme song. 'I sampled a jail door.

Aflac Duck Sound Clip

Manual Rotax Max 125 Espanol. Mockingjay Whistle Serial Number: 85409089 Lions Gate Entertainment is understandably protective of its lucrative Hunger Games franchise, so it's no surprise they trademarked Rue's four-note song, to the United States Patent and Trademark Office as 'a human whistling a G4 eighth note, followed by a Bb4 eighth note, followed by an A4 eighth note, followed by a D4 half note, in the key of G minor.' Law & Order's 'Chung Chung' Serial Number: 76641094 That iconic two-strike 'chung chung' sound was created by composer Mike Post, who also wrote the show's theme song. 'I sampled a jail door slamming, I sampled a couple of other things, I put together this ‘clunk clunk,’ ‘ching ching,’ ‘chong chong,’ whatever the hell you want to call it,' Post.

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